What is a Sparkleball?

short answer: light ball made with string lights and plastic cups.

long answer:  The Original Sparkleball is made with Solo® 9 oz cups joined together by staples, clips, glue or soldering. 100 mini-lights are threaded into the ball, two lights to a cup.  Different cups and lights can be used.   However, all sparkleballs are built by people.  Nothing commercial has ever fully replicated the magic of a lighted sparkleball.

Sparkleballs started popping up around the US in the 1970s.  No one knows who invented it or where the first one was made, but the craft has now spread around the world.  In Italy sparkleball snowmen are popular. In Fullerton, California, one neighborhood hangs over 500 sparkleballs during the holidays.  Guy kept his wife’s sparkleball going for 27 years, which is pretty amazing. Photos really don’t do them justice.  Time to make one and see :)


• DIY The Original Sparkleball.
• Order the original  Make-A-Sparkleball Kit
• Sparkleball photos on Pinterest and Instagram.

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Want to make a Sparkleball? Talk to Carl.

After Carl Boro saw a neighbor’s sparkleball, he went home and just figured out how to make one. With time he developed his own designs and methods, creating a garage full of colorful sparkleballs made from different cups and lights. He sent me some photos a few years ago, and we began a lively email exchange.

In 2015 I visited Carl at home near San Francisco.  It’s no exaggeration to say that day changed my life.  The fun we had exchanging ideas and working together cemented our friendship.  It also pushed me to update and improve this website.  I became more determined to share the mutual enthusiasm of friendship and craft with people like you, so that all of us around the world can work together — no matter what our beliefs or backgrounds–  in a safe, creative virtual garage like Carl’s.

Below are just a few of Carl’s creations, as well as links to posts about him.  Leave a comment and Carl will answer. To see over 90  photos of Carl’s wondrous work, visit Pinterest.

PINTEREST / Carl Boro Sparkleballs 

VIDEOS /
Carl’s Trick for Keeping The Lights
from Slipping Out
Carl’s Trick for Making Perfect Holes

POSTS /
Visit to Carl’s Workshop 1
**Visit to Carl’s Workshop 2**
Visit to Carl’s Workshop 3
Hard Cup vs Soft Cup
Black Cup Sparkleball
“Retro” Ball
How to Get It Really Round
Hard Cups and Bobby Pins
Moonglow Sparkleball
Turducken Sparkleball
Game Day Ball for Dad
Halloween Ideas
New Year’s Eve Ideas

 

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Hard Cup vs Soft Cup

the one that broke

A few days ago, I dropped an old Hard-Cup Sparkleball I love. Five cups shattered, and  there’s no way to repair it.  That’s the thing about hard cups.  They’re really sparkly, but they crack. Two other important points:  you can’t staple them and they are a slightly different size than solo-style cups.  BUT they come in more colors!

Here are the  instructions for making a Hard Cup Sparkleball.  I used to use a soldering iron to melt the cups together, but now I use hot glue.   (Master Sparkleballer Carl Boro uses silicon caulk.)  From the instructions you’ll learn that there’s a different formula in how you put the Hard Cup Sparkleball together.   This is very important.  If you try to make it like an Original Sparkleball, it won’t work.  You’ll need more cups too.

photos below by Carl Boro, who loves making hard-cup sparkleballs.

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Baltimore Ball Drop

Every New Year’s Eve there’s a party crawl in Steven Wilson’s Baltimore neighborhood.  Neighbors visit 5-6 houses, then end up at Steven’s house.   This year he decided to go all out with a spectacular Midnight Ball Drop.  Starting the project in early December, Steven built a mega-sparkleball with 10 oz hard cups, foil tape, and Applights.  He ran PVC pipe through the middle so the ball would slide down a pole and made a support out of wire hoops from Michael’s. And that’s just the half of it.  Check out the rooftop lowering system.

Video of the drop 

Thank you Steven for sharing the photos, video, and idea.

 

 

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